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  1. She had only worked at his company for a year, but her boss cared for her, even after her death. Liu Fenni, an employee of U Stars Supermarket, died of cardiac arrest last Monday (Sept 12) at Singapore General Hospital. She was 39. And to thank her for her hard work, her boss contributed $10,000 to her funeral expenses, 8World reported. Liu had ill health in recent years, her mum Cai Meiling said. She suffered a stroke in 2020 and was found to have late-stage kidney failure. Despite being on medication and undergoing dialysis last year, Liu's condition continued to deteriorate. "Before she died, my daughter told me that she might not be able to make it through the night," Cai said. "I comforted her and told her not to think too much. I didn't expect to receive a call from the hospital the following morning saying she had died." Cai, 57, regretted not being there with her daughter when she died. Caring boss Before joining U Stars Supermarket, Liu had worked at another supermarket. While there, her current boss, who was impressed by her work attitude, invited her to work at U Star Supermarket's Choa Chu Kang branch. Worried about Liu's heavy workload there, he later transferred her to the Punggol outlet. He also showed concern for Liu's health during the time she worked at the supermarket, Cai said. When the man offered to foot the $10,000 bill for Liu's funeral, she wanted to turn down the offer. But he told the grieving mum "it was to repay her daughter for her hard work". Cai eventually accepted the kind gesture, saying she was grateful that he recognised her daughter's contributions to the company. Kampung spirit Sheng Siong's management similarly contributed money to funerals, but they extended the help to complete strangers. During the circuit breaker in 2020, the bereaved family's relatives saw one of the staff discreetly slip $200 into the collection box at the wake. When asked, the man confessed that he was instructed by the supermarket's management to walk around the estate and look for wakes to make donations. A Sheng Siong spokesperson told AsiaOne then that it had been a company tradition for over 30 years. "This is Sheng Siong’s way of keeping the 'kampung spirit' alive," he explained.
    7 points
  2. She don't wear also make sense because the bra has nothing to support anyway
    7 points
  3. Skali kgk @HarrisY1 tio trap by transformer or he tio covid got 失忆 and cannot remember password like what he did to his old account.
    7 points
  4. 6 points
  5. Taking a short break with the missus to see autumn leaves in US and Canada. We usually do this autumn leave thing in Japan but this time we thought we’d travel farther. Journey obviously started in Bangkok. Then we catch a direct flight from Singapore to New York, yes our journey shall start from New York City. The flight is expected to take 18 hours but this is a very comfortable aircraft an Airbus 350-900. Seats are super wide Lots of legroom Lots of storage too Will sign in again when arrive
    6 points
  6. For his size I have to admit he does have some moves
    6 points
  7. RIP There's strong stigma and lack of understanding about clinical depression in our society, need to educate the public that it's nothing to be ashamed of, and one needs to seek medical help for it just like other illnesses.
    6 points
  8. @chamfer @socrates469bc kgk xdd say he patch back with his chinnie atb gf liao...now he is chin deep in her pgd
    6 points
  9. Not that I support or condone Russia attacking or committing any atrocities but personally I dont believe news 100% from any sides these days because anything and everything can be fabricated. Evidence can be tampered, DNA can be faked, IP address can be spoofed, eyewitness can be bribed etc. I am just going to take everything with a pinch of salt when it comes to main stream media
    5 points
  10. @ManOfTheHour @classyNfabulous @CannotTahanLiao
    5 points
  11. Die cock standing was not meant to be taken literary, just saying.
    5 points
  12. As usual kena caught liao then all this shit excuses come out. knn when rape that time why no think of your own fucking poor health?? hope his inmates know what a fucking beast he is
    5 points
  13. this happens in Singapore also ma. many KGKs go mourn someone but in turn kena fuck backside by his son now.
    5 points
  14. Show respect? Sure Mourn? For what? What did the Queen do for you that you need to mourn for her? She paid for your mortage or your children's education?
    5 points
  15. 5 points
  16. then u will see a harrisy2 wahahaha
    5 points
  17. oh accidentally share those that I like lol
    5 points
  18. tldr....i stopped reading once i saw the photo a SPG and AMDK. moreover i'm sure she has never stayed in a HDB before in her life
    5 points
  19. Warning: DO NOT WATCH in the middle of the night.
    4 points
  20. ish jin dua lipas @noobmaster @CannotTahanLiao @[email protected] https://youtu.be/mcMbU6VzPGg?t=1078
    4 points
  21. Just remember when the going gets tough, seek help and
    4 points
  22. Hair tying for non-lewd and appropriate admiration https://www.instagram.com/p/CiH3gujLVav/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
    4 points
  23. It's like watching a bully slapping a younger child, and the bully turn around and ask you why the child slap him and you say he slap the child
    4 points
  24. 4 points
  25. @classyNfabulous @CannotTahanLiao I think @ExTreMisTxxx will be writing some poems
    4 points
  26. if fish too expensive eat lobster la. need me to teach you all meh ps: i learn from the most stupid
    4 points
  27. @CannotTahanLiao @ExTreMisTxxx @classyNfabulous
    4 points
  28. ya man 70 yr old ah ma have to ask herself who she has been voting for all these years LOL
    4 points
  29. Sure i will award you 30k for the compensation. but i will fine you 40k for the illegal plants. you also die cock stand and diam diam liao LOL
    4 points
  30. actually i have to admit he quite good. nvr misses a beat from the music hahaha
    4 points
  31. Depression in men is increasing and we are told to just “man up” “be strong” Depression is not a weakness. I wish people are more tolerant and understanding.
    4 points
  32. i like this comment. quote" I've said it before, if Singapore ever has to fight a war I suggest we draft people from ST Forum and Facebook comment sections first, since that's where all the real patriots are"
    4 points
  33. Tio kidnapped riao
    4 points
  34. I need to wash my eyes after seeing this.
    4 points
  35. If my wife ish like her working diligently in a fish market, moi would appreciate her more by sniffing her armpits and starfish. This ish a way to appreciate her hardwork
    4 points
  36. Woah Chestnut is alive, heng ah, not like the si biantai @HarrisY1 don't know die where.
    4 points
  37. SMLJ is a beautiful pair of silver handcuffs? wife is into 50 shades of grey? KNN This statements sounds like an advert for SPF sia. maybe next time police can use this in their recruitment ads
    4 points
  38. let do the reverse. marry a guy with man boob. then the female can teh neh neh and tune radio and squeeze butt cheek
    4 points
  39. https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Asia-Insight/Laos-debt-pressure-raises-specter-of-a-China-vassal-state?utm_campaign=GL_asia_daily&utm_medium=email&utm_source=NA_newsletter&utm_content=article_link&del_type=1&pub_date=20220906190000&seq_num=2&si=44594 Laos owes more than half its foreign debt to China, including "hidden obligations," and experts say the Southeast Asian country could end up bartering away land and resources for relief. © Illustration by Hiroko Aida Laos' debt pressure raises specter of a China vassal state Echoes of Sri Lanka on the Mekong as muzzled public seethes over economic woes MARWAAN MACAN-MARKAR, Asia regional correspondentSeptember 6, 2022 06:00 JST NONG KHAI, Thailand -- At gas stations in Nong Khai, a quiet Thai town on the western banks of the Mekong River, streams of vehicles pulling up reveal the troubles across the waterway in Vientiane, the capital of Laos. The drivers with Laotian license plates come with two requests: a full tank, and extra fuel for the 20-liter containers they have on board. Many roll up in high-end SUVs or sleek Mercedes-Benzes, popular among the wealthy few in their impoverished country. "Some of the drivers are regulars, known to us, and they complain about the high price or short supply" of gas back in Laos, said Kiri Malaya, a station attendant, as he filled up a black Range Rover and a blue jerrycan. Kiri has been busier since June. By that month, Laos' gasoline prices were up by 107.1% on the year. But fuel is not the only item on the shopping lists of Laotians who cross the nearby bridge connecting the two countries. An office worker from Vientiane said she comes for household staples like soap, detergent, clothes and even food, since "some are not available in the shops or are now more expensive than before." A baker, struggling with rising costs of ingredients, said, "I have to find new supplies that are cheaper." Living under a communist regime notorious for its oppression and opaqueness, they and other Laotians avoid complaining openly, apart from whispers and rare outbursts of anger on social media. Nong Khai, however, offers a vantage point on their hardships and the risks their China-reliant country faces. Experts have warned the strongmen of the Lao People's Revolutionary Party that there are multiple economic land mines in their midst. The $18 billion economy's depleted foreign reserves and its unsustainable foreign debt -- much of it owed to China for large-scale infrastructure projects like a multibillion-dollar railway -- have prompted some to compare Laos to Sri Lanka. The bankrupt South Asian island ran out of dollars to service its foreign obligations in April, becoming the first country in the region to default in decades. A view of the Mekong river bordering Thailand and Laos is seen from the Thai side at Nong Khai in 2019. The town offers a vantage point on the Laotian economic crisis. © Reuters In Laos, "the macroeconomic situation is very challenging," said Alex Kremer, country manager at the World Bank. The bank warned in May that many in the nation of about 7 million were "at risk of falling into poverty, especially in towns and cities," as prices rise faster than incomes. Overall inflation hit 25.6% in July, according to official statistics. Kremer said that structural weaknesses "have been exacerbated by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, a deteriorating global macroeconomic environment and the rapid depreciation of the Lao kip," the local currency. A year ago, the exchange rate was about 9,400 kip to the dollar. By mid-2022, some exchange outlets in Vientiane were listing rates of about 15,000 kip per dollar. On the black market, the figure was even higher, at about 19,000 kip. The crumbling local currency has prompted Thai analysts to sound the alarm over a severe shortage of foreign reserves in Laos, currently estimated to be roughly $1.3 billion. That is enough to cover only 2.2 months of imports, and will make it a squeeze to service $1.3 billion in foreign debts this year. The country is "suffering from twin deficits -- fiscal deficit and current-account deficit -- amid thin foreign exchange reserves," said Sathit Talaengsataya, a senior economist at Thailand's Krungsri Research. He said that over the past decade, Laos has run fiscal deficits equivalent to 3% to 4% of gross domestic product annually, requiring substantial external financing and resulting in the current-account deficit averaging more than 10% of GDP. Sathit called this a "chronic problem" necessitating an immediate "reset of the economy." Some shaken Laotian leaders have made rare admissions about the country's dire straits. Bounleua Sinxayvoravong, who was appointed central bank governor in June after his predecessor was fired, hinted at the panic in an address to party apparatchiks in the National Assembly. "From the start of 2021 to the first quarter of this year, Laos should have received $9.81 billion, however, only 32% of this entered the banking system of our country," he said, according to local reports. Yet the leadership is coy about how deeply their country is indebted to China, and the potential implications. AidData, a research lab at William & Mary college in the U.S., calculates that Laos racked up $5.57 billion in official debts to China during a borrowing spree from 2000 to 2017. Even that "is only the tip of the iceberg," said Bradley Parks, executive director at AidData. "Laos also has an unusually high level of hidden public debt exposure to China -- an additional $6.69 billion," he said, or about 35% of GDP. AidData defines hidden debts as those contracted by entities wholly or partially owned by the government of Laos but without an explicit sovereign repayment guarantee. Consequently, Laos' total "debt exposure to China is worth approximately $12.2 billion, or 64.8% of GDP," Parks told Nikkei Asia. The World Bank estimated that total public and publicly guaranteed debts stood at 88% of GDP in 2021. But since the World Bank's figure excludes Laos' hidden public debts to China, Parks said, "the country's true level of public debt exposure to all creditors is most likely north of 120% of GDP." "There is no other country in the world with a higher level of public debt exposure to China as a percentage of host country GDP," he added. Not surprisingly, the danger of Laos following Sri Lanka into default has grown, since its annual foreign debt bill averages $1.3 billion until 2025, according to the World Bank. In June, global ratings agency Moody's lowered Laos' credit rating further into junk territory. "Default risk will remain high given very weak governance, a very high debt burden and insufficient coverage of external debt maturities by foreign exchange reserves," Moody's said. This has sparked a diplomatic scramble by Laotian leaders seeking help from China as well as Vietnam and longtime ally Russia, according to seasoned observers familiar with politics in Vientiane. In May, the government invited ambassadors from the three countries for a discussion with relevant agencies and private banks to "resolve the current economic crisis," said Japanese scholar Norihiko Yamada, a Laos specialist who has worked in many government ministries there. "The results and the content of the consultations are not yet known, but it is possible that not only China but also Vietnam and Russia [may get involved] in assisting Laos," he said. Other experts think Laos may benefit from a shift in China's thinking on the debt loads of developing countries. While Beijing has appeared reluctant to restructure Sri Lanka's debt, observers note that it has thrown lifelines to some African countries straining under loan obligations -- largely owed to China for Belt and Road Initiative infrastructure projects, as in Laos. A high-speed railway linking Vientiane with China's Kunming, launched last December, has contributed to Laos' mountain of debt to China. © Reuters "Interest-free loans, especially to African countries, have been cancelled several times," Mengdi Yue and Christoph Nedopil Wang of the Green Finance and Development Center, a think tank at Shanghai's Fudan University, said in an email exchange with Nikkei. "China has officially expressed its stance on several occasions that it will work with other multilateral and bilateral creditors to tackle debt crises in developing countries." Some argue that countries like Laos -- one of 17 "least developed" countries where China is the single largest bilateral lender, according to the Green Finance and Development Center -- are so enmeshed with Beijing's interests that it has no option but to help. Patrick Mendis, a visiting professor of global affairs at the National Chengchi University in Taiwan and a former U.S. diplomat, said Chinese lending under the "Beijing Consensus" development model is designed on "connectivity" to China's national and security interests. Failing to assist Laos "is not an option for Beijing," Mendis said. Yet any relief efforts are also under wraps. "The Chinese offered $800 million in debt relief to Laos over the past two years, and that gave the Laos government breathing room for external financing pressures," said Jeremy Zook, Hong Kong-based director of sovereign ratings and the lead analyst for Laos at Fitch, the ratings agency. "There are other discussions going on between Laos and China about the nature of future debt relief or debt restructuring to ease the near-term burden, but it is difficult to get an accurate read." The handling of Laos' unpaid debts to China in the past may provide clues -- and hint at a bailout that could turn the Southeast Asian country into an economic vassal state. Previous debt-relief options have ranged from swaps for equity in Laotian state entities to carving out land to pacify Chinese creditors. "There is certainly some historical precedent for bartering land and natural resources to repay foreign debts in Laos or to support domestic infrastructure," said Keith Barney, an academic at the Australian National University in Canberra. Vientiane boasts of such a swap. Laos' government handed over a marsh to build a special economic zone as part of a deal to repay the Chinese, who had built a $100 million National Stadium in time for the 2009 Southeast Asian Games, which Laos hosted. "This is part of the idea of 'turning land into capital,' which was a key development slogan of Laos and implicit policy through the 2000s," Barney said. Laos' government handed over a marsh to build a special economic zone as part of a deal to repay the Chinese, who had built a $100 million National Stadium for the 2009 Southeast Asian Games in Vientiane. © AP But will the Laotian public remain silent spectators if their country is carved up by China, debt by debt? Public sentiment has already turned sour against the one-party, socialist state as the mismanaged economy and dollar crunch make it increasingly difficult to pay for essential imports like fuel and cooking gas. "The word on the street among Laotians in business is that the country is becoming a failed state," a Thai investment consultant who has clients in Vientiane told Nikkei. "Never before has the Laotian public been so angry with the government. ... Its legitimacy to rule is being shredded."
    4 points
  40. u all dont disturb our kgt xdd @HarrisY1. he is now enjoying with the pgds of his new friends in changi bas chalets.
    4 points
  41. The one got stuff a lot of stuffing is it instead of doing plastic.....
    4 points
  42. what do you expect from them? they are fucking lazy period. they dun give a fuck if it's crowded. they wont open more counters to cater to you. efficiency is not in their dictionary.
    4 points
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