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https://asia.nikkei.com/Economy/Bangkok-to-lift-ban-on-alcohol-consumption-in-restaurants-on-Nov.-1?utm_campaign=GL_your_week_in_asia&utm_medium=email&utm_source=NA_newsletter&utm_content=article_link&del_type=7&pub_date=20211101083000&seq_num=4&si=44594

 

Bangkok to lift ban on alcohol consumption in restaurants on Nov. 1
Kingdom also to scrap night curfew, hurrying to revive economy with tourists

 

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A mixologist creates gin based cocktails at a bar in Bangkok, Thailand in January 2017.   © AP
MASAYUKI YUDA, Nikkei staff writerOctober 29, 2021 20:33 JST

 

BANGKOK -- The Thai government is trying to patch up the economy amid the COVID-19 crisis by easing restrictions such as a ban on public drinking in the capital, in order to attract more international tourists.

 

The government's special policymaking body, the Center for COVID-19 Situation Administration, decided on Friday to allow four tourist destinations -- Bangkok, Phuket, Krabi and Pang-nga -- to start serving alcoholic beverages in public starting Nov. 1.

 

From next Monday, Thailand will welcome fully-vaccinated visitors from 45 countries and Hong Kong without requiring any quarantine period. The tourism reopening will be a crucial step for the economic recovery of Thailand, as tourism and related businesses used to account for 20% of country's gross domestic product.

 

The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration will judge the level of easing in the capital as a response to the center's decision. As of Oct. 29, restaurants are allowed to serve customers for dining in, but they can't furnish alcohol for in-house consumption. Pubs, bars, Karaoke clubs and entertainment complexes are not allowed to operate. Before Monday, the local government is expected to announce which services or businesses will be allowed to resume operation.

 

The center also reviewed the categorization of the kingdom's 77 provinces by severity of the pandemic. From November, provinces at maximum pandemic risks were reduced to seven from the previous 23, excluding Bangkok. They are mostly border provinces with Malaysia, Cambodia and Myanmar.

 

The provinces at greatest risk must observe a nighttime curfew from 11 p.m. to 3 a.m. Bangkok will be able to regain its status as the "capital that never sleeps" starting November.

 

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Empty bar tables line the sidewalks of Soi Cowboy in Bangkok in August 2020. (Photo by Lauren DeCicca)

 

Lifting the alcohol ban is a lesson the government learned from its earlier tourism experiment. Thailand began its partial reopening with Phuket in July. The quarantine-free sandbox program has accommodated 57,880 travelers so far.

 

The project was a good chance to collect data that led to the grand reopening, but it failed to create a large boom, partially because of the alcohol ban. Although Thai government intends to promote Southeast Asia's second largest economy as a premium destination for high rollers, there still are many visitors, who see Thailand as a tropical getaway where they can enjoy beer on the beach and party all night.

 

The Tourism Authority of Thailand said the grand reopening would bring in about 300,000 foreign travelers to the capital in both November and December. To ensure a solid inflow, Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha even lobbied at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Summit, held virtually this week. On Tuesday, the premier urged his ASEAN counterparts to allow for safe travel as part of an effective implementation of the bloc's COVID-19 response.

 

Thai economy shrank 6.1% in 2020 due to lack of tourists. According to the Bank of Thailand, the economy is expected to grow by 0.7% and 3.9% in 2021 and 2022 respectively, if the country successfully accommodates 200,000 travelers in 2021 and 6 million in 2022.

 

Fully-vaccinated travelers from 45 countries and Hong Kong will still have to stay in a hotel for a day after arriving Thailand to wait for a COVID-19 test. Once a negative test result is obtained, they are free to roam around the country.

 

Incoming tourists must bear in mind that the streets of Thailand are not even close to COVID-free. On Friday, it reported 8,968 newly confirmed cases.

 

"It is almost certain that we will see a temporary rise in serious cases as we relax these restrictions," Prayuth warned when he announced the November reopening in mid-October.

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https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Thaksin-eyes-Thai-youth-vote-in-pre-election-rebranding?utm_campaign=GL_asia_daily&utm_medium=email&utm_source=NA_newsletter&utm_content=article_link&del_type=1&pub_date=20211101123000&seq_num=17&si=44594

 

Thaksin eyes Thai youth vote in pre-election rebranding
Ex-PM harnesses social media, but hesitance to tackle monarchy debate could cost votes

 

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Thaksin Shinawatra earlier this year began using a virtual room in the voice chat app Clubhouse in an attempt to attract young voters.   © Reuters
 

MARWAAN MACAN-MARKAR, Asia regional correspondentOctober 30, 2021 18:00 JST

BANGKOK -- From his perch in self-imposed exile, former Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra is reaching out to the country's young voters through social media, setting the stage to test his political brand as talk swirls in the halls of power of an early general election for Thailand in 2022.

 

Last Friday, he targeted voters in the northeast of the country through another round of informal chatter using a virtual room on Clubhouse, the audio-based social media application. The 72-year-old billionaire engaged with young participants from the rural region, where he has enjoyed deep electoral support, about options to boost their business ideas and incomes.

 

"Robotics is the future for everything in the economy," advised the former telecommunications tycoon to a clutch of young entrepreneurs who sought his advice on the direction of their small and medium-sized enterprises. Thaksin also touched on his policy staples from the past: ways to solve the low prices of rice, rubber and cassava, crops that are the mainstay of the agrarian economy in Isaan, as the northeast region of Thailand is also known.

 

"Clubhouse is an ideal way to promote his brand and his vision of the country to go forward," a confidant of Thaksin told Nikkei Asia. "It has been a freewheeling exchange, even with critics asking hostile questions, and it has an audience from the 20 to 35 age group."

 

Thaksin's Clubhouse foray, which began in earnest in February this year, has seen him take on a non-Thai moniker, "Tony Woodsome", and even make an effort to sound younger following his birthday in July, when he launched his "Thaksin 72, Tony 27" campaign. It was a playful switch of his age to suggest his avatar is young at heart.

 

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Protesters in July 2020 defy anti-COVID restrictions and gather en masse to demand the government's resignation.   © Reuters

 

This bid for the youth vote was amplified on Thursday, after his youngest daughter, 35-year-old Paetongtarn, was chosen to head the Inclusion and Innovative Advisory Committee of Pheu Thai, the country's largest opposition party, at its general assembly in the northeastern city of Khon Kaen. Her appointment affirmed the continuing hold that the Shinawatra family -- one of Thailand's most influential political clans -- have on pro-Thaksin parties.

 

The spread of Thaksin's shadow over Thailand's political landscape has begun to unnerve sections of the country's ultra-royalist and ultra-conservative establishment who currently hold power, according to political insiders. The tension has brought into stark relief the country's deeply polarized politics, which was triggered after Thaksin's twice-elected government was ousted in a 2006 military coup.

 

At the time, Thaksin headed the newly formed Thai Rak Thai Party, which had won successive landmark elections on policies that delivered on social welfare and boosted the grassroots economy. His subsequent flight into self-imposed exile as a fugitive from the law made him a contentious figure for the anti-Thaksin camp, propelling Thailand into bouts of bloody street clashes between his pro-democracy camp and the anti-democracy camp of his adversaries.

 

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A member of the "red shirt" movement holds a picture of ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra during a rally in Nakhon Pathom Province, on the outskirts of Bangkok, in May of 2014.   © Reuters

 

But his political base, drawn from the rural heartlands and urban pockets, remained loyal to the Thaksin brand during subsequent elections, even after controversial rulings by the supposedly independent judiciary had dissolved pro-Thaksin parties. These pro-Thaksin parties managed to form governments in 2008 and 2011 after winning general elections, with the latter enabling his younger sister, Yingluck, to become prime minister until 2014. Her Pheu Thai-led government was overthrown in another military coup in May of that year, cheered on by the ultra-conservatives and ultra-royalists.

 

But the last general elections in 2019, which saw the country transition from five years under junta rule to the current military-backed government, exposed a new, generational fault line. The impressive showing by the newly formed, pro-youth Future Forward Party signaled the arrival of a sizable constituency of young voters. The 81 parliamentary seats that the FFP won placed it third after Pheu Thai, which won 136 seats, and the pro-military Palang Pracharath, which won 116 seats. Pheu Thai was unable to form a government and notch up a fourth successive win for a pro-Thaksin party, because of election laws skewed to ensure a pro-military party rules.

 

The electoral math mirrored the power that young voters had in 2019, when 75% of the country's 51.2 million registered voters cast their ballots. Those aged between 18 to 25 years accounted for 7.3 million of all registered voters, while senior citizens aged 61 years and above accounted for 10 million of the voters. At the next general elections, officially scheduled for 2023, an estimated 3 million first-time voters will be added, further swelling the size of the youth vote bank.

 

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Future Forward Party leader Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit speaks at the party's headquarters in Bangkok on February 21, 2020.   © Reuters

 

Yet seasoned observers believe that Thaksin might not find it easy to woo these young voters, many of whom have been attracted to an ideology-driven politics that the FFP championed at the last elections and that its successor, Move Forward -- formed after another controversial court ruling to dissolve the upstart FFP -- is carrying on. In their crosshairs is reform of the country's entrenched, ultra-royalist power structure, including the politically sensitive position of the monarchy.

 

"Thaksin doesn't want to touch this sensitive issue, nor does Pheu Thai," said Titipol Phakdeewanich, a political scientist at Ubon Ratchathani University, based in northeast Thailand. "Thaksin may have a problem here, because Move Forward's message has penetrated into youth populations in urban and rural areas."

 

Such reluctance will limit Thaksin's reach into the market share of the youth vote, added Titipol. "So in terms of strategy, Thaksin hasn't brought in any new thinking to his political brand; the focus is only on economics."

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Last week I was applying the Certificate of Entry for the wife who is supposed to get in on 1st Nov. I was using this website to apply https://coethailand.mfa.go.th knowing  very well it will be changed to the new platform Thailand Pass on 1st Nov with website here https://tp.consular.go.th/

 

Anyway I was unsuccessful with the COE so told wife to come back on 6th Nov while I try the new platform on 1st Nov

 

So yesterday I tried but always after spending 10 minutes inputting all information at the very last minute it kept showing this error message.

 

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I tried more than 10 times and also with my mobile phone, a complete waste of time. Check with my travel agent she told me there're lots of comments and complains in the social network about this too so I was at least relieved its not my fault.

 

This morning at 6am I decided to try again and bingo this time it was good

 

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Now is just the waiting

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On 11/2/2021 at 6:55 AM, Yamato said:

Last week I was applying the Certificate of Entry for the wife who is supposed to get in on 1st Nov. I was using this website to apply https://coethailand.mfa.go.th knowing  very well it will be changed to the new platform Thailand Pass on 1st Nov with website here https://tp.consular.go.th/

 

Anyway I was unsuccessful with the COE so told wife to come back on 6th Nov while I try the new platform on 1st Nov

 

So yesterday I tried but always after spending 10 minutes inputting all information at the very last minute it kept showing this error message.

 

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I tried more than 10 times and also with my mobile phone, a complete waste of time. Check with my travel agent she told me there're lots of comments and complains in the social network about this too so I was at least relieved its not my fault.

 

This morning at 6am I decided to try again and bingo this time it was good

 

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Now is just the waiting

 

 

Just an update after yesterday's application of the ThaiPass got a reply in the evening as follows

 

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So because of this wife's coming back date had been shifted once again: from 22th/Oct to 1st/Nov to 6th/Nov and now to 12/Nov.

 

So for those who are applying please take note of the timing, also after 7 days you not sure you are going to get it or not.

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https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Coronavirus/Quarantine-free-Thailand-faces-tourism-hurdle-China-s-COVID-rules

 

Quarantine-free Thailand faces tourism hurdle: China's COVID rules
Long isolation upon return and other policies seen dampening prospects

 

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Chinese tourists arrive in Bangkok on Nov. 1. While some may come, China's own strict rules look likely to put a damper on Thailand's tourism recovery for the time being.   © Reuters
JASON TAN, Contributing writer
November 4, 2021 16:21 JST

 

BANGKOK -- Fully vaccinated visitors from dozens of countries can now enter Thailand quarantine-free, but the Southeast Asian nation's hopes for reviving its crucial tourism industry also hinge on policies at departure points -- especially China.

 

China accounted for 11 million, or more than a quarter, of the arrivals Thailand welcomed in 2019. But even though China is among the 60-plus countries and territories to which Thailand has thrown open its doors as of this month, travelers may not rush back anytime soon. Chinese are strongly discouraged from going overseas and face strict rules when they head home. Other Asian countries banking on tourism revivals, too, may have to temper their expectations.

 

Depending on the city, "mainland China imposes at least 14 days of quarantine in designated hotels, with another seven days of 'self-monitoring' at their home," said Li Ming, founder of Ming Thai Inter, a realtor in Bangkok.

 

Coco Liang, who traveled back to the central Chinese city of Chengdu in mid-October, encountered those restrictions even before she left Thailand.

 

She said airline staff at Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport had to tick off a long list before allowing her to board her flight to China. They needed to confirm, for example, that she had done a swab test seven days before flying, plus a second swab with the antibody result 48 hours before departure. The two tests had to be conducted at separate sites on the Chinese Embassy's approved list.

 

Travelers returning to China also have to fill in a declaration form saying they have mostly "self-quarantined" and minimized contact with others in Thailand for the preceding seven days.

 

Li, the realtor, did say that at least Thailand's reopening helps "those who are doing business or work trips to Thailand," though they too face a set of onerous rules upon return.

 

On social media, some Chinese people warn against traveling to Thailand, due to still-high COVID infection numbers, arguing that staying home is much safer. Thailand's daily cases surpassed the 23,000 mark in mid-August and now hover around 9,000 to 10,000 per day. China's cases, meanwhile, are in the tens or hundreds, partly due to a zero-tolerance approach that entails harsh restrictions wherever infections are found.

 

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Thailand hopes to lure back tourists from Asia and elsewhere to holiday destinations like Phuket.   © Reuters


Resuscitating tourism is vital for Thailand, which saw a record 39.8 million visitors in 2019 -- more than half its own population. The travelers brought in revenue of 1.9 trillion baht ($57 billion).

 

On Oct. 21, the Thai government announced it would open its borders wider. "If we wait until everything is fully ready, we'll be too late," Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha wrote on Facebook. "Besides, tourists may choose to go elsewhere."

 

As of Monday, fully inoculated visitors from 63 locations are allowed in quarantine-free -- up from 10 before. In addition to China, the list includes South Korea, Japan, the U.S. and Australia.

 

Thailand's Kasikorn Research Center says much will depend on the policies of travelers' countries of origin. It now expects 180,000 tourist arrivals in Thailand this year, up from a previous forecast of 150,000.

 

As it waits for Chinese to return in larger numbers, Thailand will be looking to attract travelers from elsewhere, including some of its Asian neighbors. Malaysia, its No. 2 source of visitors in 2019, is also on the quarantine-free list, as are Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines, Hong Kong and others.

 

A key source of visitors who could take up some of the slack is India, Thailand's third-largest supplier of tourists in 2019. India was a late addition to Thailand's reopening list, and officials have high hopes for income from Indian destination weddings in particular.

 

Somsong Sachaphimukh, vice president of the Thai Tourism Council, told local media that each Indian traveler spends between 27,000 and 76,000 baht per trip to Thailand, while one destination wedding could generate from 10 million to 120 million baht in revenue for the hotel and services industry.

 

India was one of Asia's hardest hit countries in the pandemic, with daily cases exceeding 400,000 earlier this year. But the situation has improved dramatically, with infections hovering below 15,000 recently.

 

Meanwhile, for some, Thailand's quarantine-free reopening just offers a chance to go home.

 

Jane Li, a 42-year-old Shanghai native who resided in Hong Kong for 10 years before relocating to Bangkok, was booked on a flight back to Thailand on Monday.

 

She had moved to the Thai capital last year and enrolled her children in an international school. But in July of this year, her family of four made a dash back to Hong Kong "for safety," just before Thailand saw its worst outbreaks yet and imposed strict curfews.

 

After a few months living lockdown-free in Hong Kong, she said it was time to return. And she was relieved that the family would not have to stay in isolation.

 

"We were cooped up in a quarantine hotel in Hong Kong for 21 days," she recalled. "I don't want to experience it again."

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Has been almost 2 years since I last traveled. In the past was at least once a month so after so long its very exciting for me.

 

4.45am Wednesday arriving at Suvarnabhumi Airport
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Miss this entrance
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A very quiet airport

 

 

Check-in
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Its all quiet and almost deserted
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Beautiful isn't it?
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Had 1.5hrs to kill
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First time using this lounge

 

 

Freshly cooked rice noodle and wanton dumplings
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Chicken boiled rice
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And once again it is time to leave. Boarding the UA 787 aircraft

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Served dinner after taking off - seabass
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Then before landing breakfast - Japanese mackerel
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Almost arriving LAX
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Landing in LAX

 

 

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Welcome message
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After clearing immigration at Terminal 1 picked up luggage, after clear customs immediately passed the luggage to ground staff for next flight. Then walked to Terminal 7 a 15-20mins walk

Had 2 hours to kill so waited here
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https://www.newsbreak.com/news/2431954341797/thai-king-returns-to-germany-with-250-strong-entourage-and-30-poodles

 

Thai king returns to Germany with 250-strong entourage and 30 poodles

 

By Shweta Sharma
The Independent 2 hours ago

 

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Thailand ’s king Maha Vajiralongkorn returned to Germany for the first time in over a year with his entourage of more than 250 people and a beloved pack of 30 poodles.

 

The 69-year-old monarch and his entourage were pictured at an airport hotel outside Munich after their flight in a luxurious private jet, German tabloid The Bild reported on Wednesday.

 

Wearing a brown and orange tracksuit, the king was pictured on the way to the pool of the  Hilton Airport hotel in Munich.

 

The king, who is known for his love of dogs and famously promoted his pet poodle Fu-Fu to the rank of Air Chief Marshall, reached Munich on Monday and booked the entire fourth floor for 11 days.

 

This was the king’s first official trip abroad since pro-democracy protests and unprecedented public criticism of the royals over laws that punish defaming the monarchy with up to 15 years in prison. More than 156 people have charged with the royal laws related to insulting monarchs, said the Thai Lawyers for Human Rights group.

 

His first trip to Germany in more than a year came after the sovereign faced criticism for absence as coronavirus cases spiked in April and May. He was residing in a hotel in Germany’s Bavarian Alps that was closed to the public with his entourage of staff and dogs.

“He’s back and is feeling at home with his poodles in his favourite kingdom of Bavaria,” Bild wrote.

 

He returned to Thailand in October last year to mark the fourth anniversary of his father’s death amid pro-democracy protests. But the return was widely believed that it was in response to the criticism.

 

The reason for the king’s frequent trips and his relationship with Germany are not known.

 

He was titled Crown Prince of Thailand by his father King Bhumibol Adulyadej in a ceremony in 1973. In his early years, he was educated in a school in Bangkok and at the age of 13 he was sent to the UK for schooling. He completed his university education in Australia’s Royal Military College, Duntroon, for his arts degree as a corporal.

 

After his advanced training in Thailand, the UK, US and Australia, he took the role of a officer in Thai armed forces and also became a fighter pilot.

 

The king spends most time in his lakeside villa in the town of Tutzing — which is known as a playground for the rich.

 

His trip also coincided with the verdict by Thailand’s constitutional court on Wednesday that protesters’ demands to call for reform of the monarchy were an “abuse of the rights and freedoms and harmed the state’s security.”

 

Protests swept Thailand last over its harshest “lèse-majesté” laws, which makes it a punishable offence for anyone who “defames, insults or threatens the king, queen, heir apparent or regent.” People can face between three and 15 years in prison.

 

The ruling was described as “a judicial coup” by human rights activists who said it can pave the way for more legal cases against the protesters.

 

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https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Markets/Commodities/Australian-miner-Kingsgate-to-restart-Thai-gold-mine-operations?utm_campaign=GL_asia_daily&utm_medium=email&utm_source=NA_newsletter&utm_content=article_link&del_type=1&pub_date=20211112190000&seq_num=23&si=44594

 

Australian miner Kingsgate to restart Thai gold mine operations
Government seeks to end dispute through arbitration as critics cry foul

 

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Australian miner Kingsgate was forced to halt operations at the Chatree gold mine in Thailand on Jan 1, 2017 after the junta ordered the mine to close, citing environmental concerns.   © Reuters
APORNRATH PHOONPHONGPHIPHAT, Nikkei staff writerNovember 12, 2021 13:02 JST

 

BANGKOK -- After a four-year dispute, operations at the Chatree gold mine in Thailand, run by Australia's Kingsgate Consolidated, are scheduled to resume early next year once arbitration talks between the Thai government and the mining company are concluded.

 

Talks to resolve the dispute, taking place under the terms of the Thailand-Australia Free Trade Agreement (TAFTA), are due to conclude on Jan. 31, 2022, after being postponed several times. Kingsgate has expressed confidence that it will be able to restart operations at Chatree soon after the arbitrator reaches a final decision.

 

By the end of this year, Kingsgate should be ready to begin refurbishing the mine, with activation of its Metallurgical Processing License and renewal of its lease, Ross Smyth-Kirk, executive chairman of Kingsgate, said in a statement in late October.

 

Although the outcome of the negotiations remains unclear, Kingsgate is considering a number of options, including refurbishing the mine to access low-grade ore stockpiles for processing. The mine has around 6.6 million tons of ore and is estimated to contain 73,000 ounces of gold and 780,000 ounces of silver, according to Kingsgate.

 

Korbchai Sungsitthisawad, permanent secretary of the Thai Industry Ministry, acknowledged that the two sides are negotiating under the TAFTA dispute-settlement process.

 

Opposition parties and other critics accuse the government of caving in to Kingsgate after it realized it had little chance of prevailing, and of using the negotiation process to avoid being forced to pay massive compensation if it lost in the case.

 

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The Chatree gold mine is operated by Akara Mining, a Thai subsidiary wholly owned by Australian miner Kingsgate, produces silver and gold.   © Reuters

 

Jiraporn Sindhuprai, an opposition member of parliament said that Prime Mister Prayuth Chan-ocha's order to close down Chatree was unfair and unlawful, and that the government's move put it at a disadvantage when Kingsgate brought the case to TAFTA's dispute-settlement mechanism.

 

"The closure of the mine immediately forced villagers and workers out of their jobs, negatively affected the reputation of Thailand and required the country to spend hundreds of millions baht from the budget during the fight," Jiraporn told reporters.

 

The government is believed to have spent around 600 million baht ($18 million) during the arbitral tribunal process and would likely have been forced to pay up to 25.3 billion baht if it lost the case, according to Jiraporn.

 

The dispute began in December 2016, when Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, who was then the leader of the military government, invoked a legal provision called "Section 44" to close the Chatree mine in the northern province of Pichit, citing environmental and health concerns.

 

Section 44, which was enacted by the junta, allows the prime minister, as head of the National Council for Peace and Order, as the junta is officially known, to take whatever measures it deems necessary to prevent actions that may subvert peace and order.

 

Kingsgate had operated the Chatree mine since 2001 under Akara Resources, a Thai subsidiary wholly

owned by Kingsgate. It had a valid mining license through 2028.

 

Kingsgate, which was forced to halt operations at the mine on Jan. 1, 2017, disputed the government's decision, saying toxic substances found in the area could have come from pesticides used by farmers nearby, and brought the matter to the TAFTA dispute-settlement body.

 

Opposition legislators said Thailand was unlikely to win the case, as Section 44 was seen as inapplicable to a private foreign company, and that the government's evidence was unclear.

 

"That's why the Thai government has never revealed any progress during the fight, and just came up with a negotiation, which is likely to benefit Kingsgate," Jiraporn said.

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Being a frequent traveller for work and not been travelling for almost 2 years I always thought my first trip would be like before, for work and close by however it was not to be as last weekend decided to make a personal family trip not back to Singapore but to the States.

 

Although there is not requirement for visa for me there is still a requirement to apply for an ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization). Its done online - https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/ its easy to fill after that you pay $14 website tells you will reply within 2 days. I received a reply from them in about 1hr 10mins that its been approved. Was surprised. The other things I needed to do were standard stuff - PCR test; vaccine passport and ready to go. Need to be prepared for coming back so insurance is important and return PCR. 

 

Finally after LAX arrived in Denver Airport on Wednesday

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Took a local transport $35
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After an hour at a small town hotel
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Very nice hotel

 

 

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Edited by Yamato
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Walking the same 2km back to hotel passed by a drive-in fast food restaurant - SONIC. For me this is interesting

 

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The car on the right is buying for take away

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For cars dining in they part their cars like this and make their order, after order is ready will be send to them and eat in car

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This is outdoor dining-in (there is no indoor dining) however due to covid they don't allow eating here

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More booths for dine-in yor car

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Looking at the menu and photos I think they serve very nice fast food. Got to try if have a chance.

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Googled for Italian so found this restaurant - Scileppi's at the Old Stone Church

 

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Inside is beautiful

 

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Very nice cabsav from Napa Valley

 

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Meatballs

 

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Cold cuts

 

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Lobster ravioli

 

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Great lunch
 

 

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